7
Sep
Āpōpō
Friends supporting friends – Making it to the next day

āpōpō: the next day

It’s easy to feel overwhelmed when it comes to giving support and manaakitanga to people struggling with mental health and suicide. The Āpōpō programme seeks to empower friends and people who work with youth with easy to learn tips and tools to move the metaphorical fence far away from the edge of the cliff. Āpōpō means The Next Day, because for those struggling in this area, the idea of making it to the next day is a powerful one.

Āpōpō is a dynamic and interactive programme that equips people with basic and effective tools to feel confident in their role of supporting those around them. It is not creating mental health professionals but merely empowering through experiential learning how those closest to us can help and change the statistics that make for grim reading.

Note: For group bookings please email Jenny Mackie on [email protected]

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER


Where Henderson Campus
When 9:00am - 1:00pm
Cost $15 (includes morning tea)
RSVP Register by Monday 2 September

Details about the workshop:

  • Provides tools for helping ourselves, our friends and whānau.
  • Is based on biblical principles.
  • Looks at the warning signs of someone who is struggling.
  • Emphasises the power and practice of listening.
  • Recognises the importance of asking questions in a safe space.
  • Explores the concept, ‘Safe for now’.
  • Teaches skills that anyone can utilise, regardless of their qualification.
  • Embraces a holistic approach to health, best embodied in the ‘Te Whare Tapa Whā’ model.
  • Does not replace a professional approach. It is an initial conversation to equip people with the basic tools to support those around them.


About the Facilitator

Paul Humphreys

Paul Humphreys, is the South Island youth and camps facilitator for Scripture Union.  Paul returned to Aotearoa NZ in 2017 after serving at camps & conference centres in the USA for almost 15 years. About eight years ago his ministry adapted to the desperation he was seeing to embrace the challenges around mental health, particularly for youth and young adults. In 2015 after collaborating with The Soul Shop Movement (www.soulshopmovement.org) and running several successful retreats around suicide, Paul adapted to a NZ audience many of the concepts he helped create with several colleagues from the movement. And from there Āpōpō was crafted. He is passionate about experiential learning and finding metaphors in activities that can be applied to empower friends to help friends, a cornerstone of Āpōpō. For more information www.apopo.org.nz